Vaccine Roll Out and How People in Chicago Have Responded to the Cure for COVID-19

By Ewa Lapcyznska and Grace Lysell

Both Moderna and Pfizer COVID-19 vaccines utilize mRNA to fight the virus. Source: Wikimedia Commons

Muriel Loftus was born in 1929 and has spent the majority of her adult life in the Canaryville neighborhood, located on the South Side of Chicago, not too far from Guaranteed Rate Field.

At 92, Loftus has seen many dangerous diseases come and go before COVID-19 arrived. As a young girl, Loftus remembered chickenpox outbreaks, tuberculosis, and polio, all of which are now eradicated, thanks to life-saving vaccines.

“Like when I was young, polio was a very rapid problem…


The Severity of Gender-Based Crimes on Chicago College Campuses

How Chicago’s five largest colleges are keeping their students safe and managing crime on their campuses.

By Ewa Lapczynska and Grace Lysell

Ada Cheng has first-hand knowledge when she says college students are in a particularly vulnerable position when it comes to gender-based violence.

As the Outreach Specialist of the Campus Advocacy Network at UIC, Cheng’s goal is to provide the campus and surrounding community with the resources necessary to prevent gender-based violence, which is defined as stalking, sexual harassment, sexual assault, and domestic violence.

Cheng says that the physical effects…


The COVID-19 strain of the coronavirus was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on Mar. 11, 2020. At that time, the virus had begun to spread outside of its origin country, China, and cases were rising rapidly around Europe. On Mar. 11, the United States had 1,267 confirmed cases of COVID-19, which would quickly inflate to over 164,000 cases by the end of that month. …


Across the city of Chicago, there are currently 132 medical practices offering COVID-19 testing at their locations. Accessibility is vital to ensuring all Chicago residents can be tested whenever needed, and many testing locations are conveniently located along CTA bus routes to ensure this ease of access.

Map: Grace Lysell

As colder weather approaches, the city of Chicago and state of Illinois are citing growing Coronavirus cases. On October 19th, health officials shared that there are 3,113 new cases across the state of Illinois. With 48,684 tests administered in the last 24 hours, this brings the positivity rate to 5.4%…


Anthony Davis earned his first NBA championship title on Sunday, after the Los Angeles Lakers finished game 6 of the finals with a score of 106–93 over the Miami Heat.

Throughout his first seven seasons in the league, Davis played in the All-Star game six times and won All-Star MVP once. Though clearly talented, his effort was never enough to lead his team, the New Orleans Pelicans, past the second round of the playoffs. At the beginning of last season, Davis’s agent publicly asked for the player to be traded. The deal between the Lakers and Pelicans was finalized…


By Grace Lysell

Obama left office in 2016, but many policies created by his administration are still in place. Potentially most notably, the Affordable Care Act, dubbed Obamacare. The law aimed to limit the amount American’s spend on healthcare and reduce the quantity of uninsured citizens. Since President Trump took office in 2016, his administration has limited the reach of this program in various ways, most distinctly repealing the mandate that each individual had to be covered by either private health insurance or under the Affordable Care Act. …


Between March 3rd and June 1st, Illinois reported 46,798 positive cases of the Novel Coronavirus, also referred to as COVID-19. 36% of those who tested positive identified as Latinx.

Throughout the United States, COVID-19 has spread through communities of color much quicker than predominately white areas. WBEZ 91.5 reports that over 70% of Chicago’s first COVID-19 deaths were among Black residents. Once racial data associated with COVID-19 began to emerge, public health experts soon realized that analyzing and understanding the disparities between communities would be vital to ensure the safety of people of color.

It did not require a…


Illinois governor Pat Quinn expresses the potential impact pension reform could have on MAP grants for higher education.

By Bob Smith

Editor’s note: This story was originally posted on Dec. 12, 2012 and is housed at RedLineProject.org

Gov. Pat Quinn visited DePaul University’s Loop campus on Wednesday to discuss how pension reform is harming the Monetary Award Program (MAP) college scholarships and access to higher education in Illinois.

Pat Quinn
Pat Quinn
Gov. Pat Quinn talks about MAP grants at DePaul University. (Photo/Bob Smith)

“This is so important to our state, not only in the past, but certainly now and in the future,” Quinn said. “We want everyone to have the opportunity to go to college that has the ability to go to college.”

MAP grants are need-based college scholarships that allow merit students…

Grace Lysell

Communications major @ The University of Illinois at Chicago

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